Practical Science on Movement and Pain

Author Archives: Todd Hargrove

The Marble Hand Illusion

Moshe Feldenkrais said “we move in accordance with our self image.” A new study provides some cool evidence that our self-image is easily modified, and that the modifications have physiological consequences. The illusion was created quite simply. Researchers repeatedly struck someone’s hand very gently with a tiny hammer. Each time the hand was struck, the naturalRead More

Movement Relativism?

There is a lot of much needed skepticism on the internets these days in regard to the idea that we can diagnose movement “dysfunction” and prescribe movement “correction.” A lot of this debate centers on the FMS and other systemic approaches to improving quality of movement. I think a lot of this discussion is usefulRead More

Upcoming Events

2014 should be an exciting year for Better Movement! Here are some upcoming events. 1. The book I have sent off the manuscript to the interior designers and they should be done in a few weeks. That means I will probably have some real physical books to sell in about a month! I am extremelyRead More

Movement Variability and Resourcefulness

I have seen a lot of interesting research and discussion lately on the issue of movement variability. The ability to make small adjustments to a basic repetitive pattern like heart rate, brain waves, energy use and movement seems to be a good indicator of health and function. Experts who perform the same repetitive task (sayRead More

Highlights of 2013

Thanks for reading the blog this year everyone! Here is a brief look back at some highlights. 1. Writing a book Almost done! Hopefully this will be in final form by March 2014. This has been a very interesting and educational experience. I am very proud about the results at this point and very excited toRead More

Play, Variability and Motor Learning

I recently had the privilege of attending a continuing education class at Athletes Performance in Arizona, which is one of the top athletic training facilities in the country, run by Mark Verstegen. It’s a beautiful facility, with a nice grass field, an amazing workout room, and lots of elite athletes walking around and training. It wasRead More

Developmental Movements: Part Three

In the previous two posts, I discussed two basic ideas. First, that the developmental movement patterns learned in infancy are building blocks for the more complex movements that we use in our daily lives as adults. These simple patterns are combined to form complex movements, just as words and letters are combined to make sentences. If someoneRead More

Pain Management Conference 2014

I am very excited to announce that I will be doing a one hour presentation at the 2014 Pain Management Conference in Vancouver. The event is sponsored by the Massage Therapists Association of British Columbia, and takes place on March 28-29, 2014. There will be some great speakers, including Jan Dammerholt, Neil Pearson and Diane Jacobs. My talkRead More

Developmental Movements: Part Two

In the previous post I pointed out that the developmental movement patterns learned in infancy are building blocks for the more complex movements that we use in our daily lives as adults. These simple patterns are combined to form sophisticated movements, just as words and letters are combined to make sentences. One implication of thisRead More

Developmental Movements: Part One

Infants develop movement by progressively learning a series of fundamental movement patterns, which form the building blocks for more complex movements. For example, while lying on the ground and sitting in various positions, an infant learns to stabilize her head so she can see the world. Her head stabilization skills are a building block forRead More