Practical Science on Movement and Pain

Category Archives: coordination

Movement Variability and Resourcefulness

I have seen a lot of interesting research and discussion lately on the issue of movement variability. The ability to make small adjustments to a basic repetitive pattern like heart rate, brain waves, energy use and movement seems to be a good indicator of health and function. Experts who perform the same repetitive task (sayRead More

Developmental Movements: Part Two

In the previous post I pointed out that the developmental movement patterns learned in infancy are building blocks for the more complex movements that we use in our daily lives as adults. These simple patterns are combined to form sophisticated movements, just as words and letters are combined to make sentences. One implication of thisRead More

Some Problems with Movement “Correction”

Moshe Feldenkrais said that to “correct is incorrect.” He was referring to efforts to correct someone’s movement patterns. Which is kind of a strange thing to say for a guy whose method was largely about making people’s movement more efficient. What did he mean and what does this say about efforts to correct movement? IRead More

Review of Conference with Moseley and Hodges on Pain and Motor Control

This weekend I went to Portland, Oregon to attend a conference sponsored by the APTA Section on Women’s Health, featuring talks by Lorimer Moseley and Paul Hodges on the issues of chronic pain and motor control. It was a fantastic experience, and most of the time I was buzzing with geekcitement. Jealous you missed it?Read More

Movement of the Week: Slow Motion Soccer Kick

It’s been a while since I posted a video in my Movement of the Week series. Perhaps I should call this the “Movement of Indeterminate Time Frame.” Anyway the featured movement in this post is a very cool slow motion video of a vicious soccer shot. I found this after Clifton Tarski commented on my “Best Athlete in theRead More

The World’s Best Athlete Part Three

Welcome to the third and final installment of my best athlete in the world series. In this post I will actually name the winner. But first a quick review of my existing ground rules, and the addition of two additional criteria that will narrow things down to our winner pretty quickly. As I discussed inRead More

The World’s Best Athlete, Part Two

Welcome to part two of my argument for who is the world’s greatest athlete. Here is a brief summary of part one. First, I concede there is no way to arrive at a truly objective answer here, because it necessarily calls into play subjective preferences. However, after starting with some admittedly arbitrary ground rules, IRead More

Who is the Best Athlete in The World?

I have heard many arguments about who is the world’s best athlete. To be honest, most of them are completely idiotic. But let’s face it, if you ask a stupid question you get a stupid answer. And that’s what I have done here, because I enjoy the occasional bar room debate. So I am puttingRead More

Dem Bones: Skeletal Structure and Movement Function

I don’t write about structure that often on this blog. That is not because I don’t think structure is an important determinant of how we move and feel. Structure is incredibly important. It’s just that, unlike function, structure is pretty tough to change significantly in the short term. The best example of the stability ofRead More

Some Good Quotes from “Movement” by Gray Cook

I recently picked up a copy of Gray Cook’s new book called Movement. I have only read a few chapters, but I have already seen some excellent quotes that I want to share below. In case you haven’t heard of Cook, he is a well-known physical therapist who developed the popular functional movement screen (FMS).Read More