Practical Science on Movement and Pain

Category Archives: coordination

A Systems Perspective on Motor Control, Part One

Dynamic systems theory (DST) is gaining influence in the world of movement rehab and performance as way to explain how motor learning is optimized. The basic premise is that movement behavior is the result of complex interactions between many different subsystems in the body, the task at hand, and the environment. Given this complexity, systems… Read More

How to Walk Without Muscles (Or a Brain)

Could a robot walk without motors to power the movement or computers to control it? Apparently so. Watch this eight-second video for proof. Via Noijam Here’s another cool video of a passive robot and his proud Papa, who can just barely deal with his nerdy excitement: h/t Sarah Young. It’s a bit shocking to see… Read More

Thoughts on Trip to Spain

I recently returned from a two-week trip to Spain with family and friends. Before I went, I was telling people about it, and they all said “Wow, Spain, awesome!!” And then their expression would shift a little, and they would ask whether I was taking my two young kids. I would say yes, and then they would… Read More

Movement Variability and Resourcefulness

I have seen a lot of interesting research and discussion lately on the issue of movement variability. The ability to make small adjustments to a basic repetitive pattern like heart rate, brain waves, energy use and movement seems to be a good indicator of health and function. Experts who perform the same repetitive task (say… Read More

Developmental Movements: Part Two

In the previous post I pointed out that the developmental movement patterns learned in infancy are building blocks for the more complex movements that we use in our daily lives as adults. These simple patterns are combined to form sophisticated movements, just as words and letters are combined to make sentences. One implication of this… Read More

Some Problems with Movement “Correction”

Moshe Feldenkrais said that to “correct is incorrect.” He was referring to efforts to correct someone’s movement patterns. Which is kind of a strange thing to say for a guy whose method was largely about making people’s movement more efficient. What did he mean and what does this say about efforts to correct movement? I… Read More

Movement of the Week: Slow Motion Soccer Kick

It’s been a while since I posted a video in my Movement of the Week series. Perhaps I should call this the “Movement of Indeterminate Time Frame.” Anyway the featured movement in this post is a very cool slow motion video of a vicious soccer shot. I found this after Clifton Tarski commented on my “Best Athlete in the… Read More

The World’s Best Athlete Part Three

Welcome to the third and final installment of my best athlete in the world series. In this post I will actually name the winner. But first a quick review of my existing ground rules, and the addition of two additional criteria that will narrow things down to our winner pretty quickly. As I discussed in… Read More

The World’s Best Athlete, Part Two

Welcome to part two of my argument for who is the world’s greatest athlete. Here is a brief summary of part one. First, I concede there is no way to arrive at a truly objective answer here, because it necessarily calls into play subjective preferences. However, after starting with some admittedly arbitrary ground rules, I… Read More