Practical Science on Movement and Pain

Category Archives: pain reduction

Summary of Great Interview with Kieran O’Sullivan

I just listened to an excellent interview of physical therapist and back pain researcher Kieran O’Sullivan at the PhysioEdge blog. Kieran is part of the group at Pain.Ed, which also includes Peter O’Sullivan, who is, by the way, featured in a very cool video I discussed here. (In case you are wondering, there are several groupRead More

Graded Exposure

Graded exposure is a key concept in understanding how to reduce pain caused by movement. It’s a very common sense idea, and one that most people kind of know at some level, because there is profound truth to it. But it’s also an idea that most people will probably fail to put into practice in aRead More

Book Excerpt: Sensation Versus Perception

Since I’m in the process of writing a book, I don’t have much time to post. So here’s a little excerpt from the book. It’s about the distinction between sensation and perception. *     *     * Although the terms sensation and perception are often used interchangeably in everyday life, psychologists distinguish betweenRead More

Pain Science Confusion

In recent years, pain science has become far more widely known, and that is leading to some interesting conversation and also confusion in the fitness, massage and manual therapy communities. Lorimer Moseley and David Butler have been charismatic and influential teachers on this issue. A good example of their work is found in the popularRead More

Part Two of Review of Geoffrey Bove Workshop on Pain, Nociception and Nerves

This is part two of my review of the workshop on Pain, Nociception and Nerves with Geoffrey Bove. Here is a link to the first part. In this part I will discuss what we learned about inflammation, fascia and trigger points. The role of inflammation Inflammation plays a huge role in nociception. And vice versa.Read More

Review of Geoffrey Bove Workshop on Pain, Nociception and Nerves: Part One

This weekend I had the pleasure of attending a workshop hosted by Geoffrey Bove on “Pain, Nociception and Nerves.” Geoff has forgotten more about these topics than most people will ever know, because he has conducted a great deal of the original research which contributes to our knowledge about these issues, particularly as it relatesRead More

How Does Foam Rolling Work?

Foam rolling is very popular. Athletic trainers use it as a part of the warm-up. Physical therapists use it as part of their treatment strategy, often to improve extensibility of “short” tissues. There is very limited evidence about what benefit, if any, foam rolling confers. But there are at least a few studies showing thatRead More

Watch Your Back: Mirrors Reduce Back Pain

I just read an interesting paper from Lorimer Moseley‘s group about how looking at your back in the mirror can reduce back pain. The paper describes a simple study where people with back pain were asked to make numerous repetitive provocative movements of the low back under two conditions: one group was able to see theirRead More

Meditation and Pain

One of the goals of the Feldenkrais Method is to develop greater awareness of your movement patterns. Why? According to Moshe Feldenkrais “if you know what you are doing you can do what you want.” Sounds reasonable enough. I was reminded of this quote after reading about a line of research which attempts to showRead More

Some Readers Comment on the Benefits of Learning About Pain

Recently I have received some great comments from readers which illustrate a very important point: pain education can help reduce threat, pain and disability. This is particularly true when it serves to alleviate threats created by well meaning health care providers who ascribe too much importance to some alleged structural pathology as the cause ofRead More