Practical Science on Movement and Pain

Category Archives: strength

Interview with Israel Halperin

I am very pleased to offer an interview with Israel Halperin, an athlete, trainer, and researcher with extensive knowledge about how to improve human performance. I have interacted with Israel over Facebook for quite a while, and really appreciate his expertise, open-mindedness, curiosity, and willingness to share information. I always find it interesting when people… Read More

Developmental Movements: Part Three

In the previous two posts, I discussed two basic ideas. First, that the developmental movement patterns learned in infancy are building blocks for the more complex movements that we use in our daily lives as adults. These simple patterns are combined to form complex movements, just as words and letters are combined to make sentences. If someone… Read More

What is Your Movement Style?

Panjabi divided the motor control system for the spine into three distinct subsystems –  passive, active and neural. I like applying this idea to the whole body, partly because I find it an interesting way to distinguish different strategies for movement and posture, based on preferential use of one subsystem over the others. The passive… Read More

Extreme Performance or Optimal Health? Pick One!

Many of my clients will ask my opinion about whether a particular sport or activity promotes movement health. Yoga, running, swimming, weight training, ballet, soccer, gymnastics, crossfit. (People are especially interested in whether these activities will be healthy for their kids.) It’s an interesting question because almost any physical activity you can think of has… Read More

The Arthrokinetic Reflex

What is the arthrokinetic reflex and what does it have to do with strength, mobility, flexibility and joint mobility drills? Here is a (very) quick explanation. The arthrokinetic reflex defined Arthro means joint. Kinetic means movement. Reflex means involuntary movement in response to a stimulus. Put them together and you have a term coined by… Read More