Practical Science on Movement and Pain

Category Archives: visualization

Watch Your Back: Mirrors Reduce Back Pain

I just read an interesting paper from Lorimer Moseley‘s group about how looking at your back in the mirror can reduce back pain. The paper describes a simple study where people with back pain were asked to make numerous repetitive provocative movements of the low back under two conditions: one group was able to see theirRead More

The Incredible Visual Skills of Cristiano Ronaldo

I have previously written about the importance of visual processing for athletic performance. I just came across a video demonstrating the unbelievable (I mean that literally) visual skills of a world class athlete, via the excellent Axon Sports blog. In the video, sports scientists test the visual processing of Christiano Ronaldo, one of the worldsRead More

Two Ways to Hack Your Jumping Software

In the Feldenkrais movement class I was teaching the other night I had an interesting discussion with a student who is a parkour instructor at Seattle’s Parkour Visions gym. One of the fundamental skills in parkour is jumping with power and landing jumps safely. The instructor was relating some of the ways he teaches theseRead More

The Limits of Imagination

If you can dream it you can do it! Well, according to a recent study, maybe not so much, at least when your dream is to rehabilitate an arm weakened by stroke.

I have written several times on this blog about how imagery and visualization can be used to build coordination and physical skills. For example . . .Read More

Mirror Neurons – Can You Get Better at Sports by Just Watching?

Image via Wikipedia The last post was about improving coordination by just imagining movement.  The basic idea is that imagining the performance of a skill will activate almost the exact same neural pathways as actually performing it, so that you can better at something purely by visualization.  This post takes the same idea a littleRead More

Moving Better By Just Thinking About It

One of the main themes of this blog is that the brain has far more control over strength, speed, flexibility and coordination than most people imagine.  Nothing makes this point more clear than the fact that we can dramatically improve our physical performance by doing nothing more than thinking about it.  In this post IRead More