Looking at Pain From Different "Levels"

Pain can be a complex phenomenon, and complex systems are often nested. That means the system as a whole is composed of smaller subsystems, which are also composed of smaller subsystems and so forth. The reason this is interesting from a practical perspective is that each nested system provides a different level from which we can attempt to explain and treat pain.


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Update on Progress of New Book: Playing With Movement

I have been a bit negligent in updating this blog recently but I have an excuse - I'm hard at work on a new book that I hope to complete by this fall: Playing with Movement: Simple Solutions for a Complex Body

Like the first book (A Guide to Better Movement), the general goal is to help people move better and feel better through application of practical science on pain and motor learning. But the subject matter in this book is far more expansive and ambitious.

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The Intentional Stance

According to very smart guy Dan Dennett, we use very different kinds of thinking tools to predict the behavior of different systems, depending in part on the system’s complexity. In this post I'll describe three levels of analysis described by Dennett that we can use to understand the body: the physical stance, the design stance and the intentional stance. 

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Experts And Gurus: What's the Difference?

What’s the difference between a guru and an expert? The dictionary assigns the two words the same basic meaning: someone with a high level of knowledge in a particular field. But the term guru definitely has an unwholesome connotation. People respect experts, but worship gurus, imagining they have totally unrealistic levels of knowledge and power. In the context of science, that's a problem.

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Predictive Coding: Why Expectation Matters for Movement and Pain

Predictive coding is a hip new model for perception that I have been studying lately. In some ways it is very common sense and intuitive, and in others it is very challenging and mind expanding. I see it as a useful bridge between conventional ways of thinking about perception and something completely new and different. Here’s a post describing what I’ve learned that I find interesting and practical

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Review of "Strength Training and Coordination: An Integrative Approach" by Frans Bosch

I recently finished the above-titled book by Frans Bosch. It's one of those books where you do a lot of underlining. It's also one of the best books on movement I’ve read in a while so I decided to write a review and (rather lengthy) summary of the some of the ideas I found interesting.

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Models of Pain and Movement

There are various models used to understand pain. I often see debate as to the relative merit of these models, which is a good thing. But what I think is not such a good thing is when people argue that because a model has a certain flaw or limitation, it is fatally deficient.

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